Facebook and Tunisian Hacks

During the uprising in Tunisia, the government attempted to hack into several Facebook accounts.  Alexis Madrigal, at The Atlantic, does a bang up job looking at how Facebook is not just a tool for organizing social protests, but also as a back door for countries to discover who might be a threat.

If you need a parable for the potential and pitfalls of a social-media enabled revolution, this is it: the very tool that people are using for their activism becomes the very means by which their identities could be compromised. When the details are filled in on the abstractions of Clay Shirky and Evgeny Morozov’s work on the promise (former) and danger (latter) of Internet activism, the ground truth seems to be that both had their visions play out simultaneously.

At Facebook, Sullivan’s team decided to take an apolitical approach to the problem. This was simply a hack that required a technical response. “At its core, from our standpoint, it’s a security issue around passwords and making sure that we protect the integrity of passwords and accounts,” he said. “It was very much a black and white security issue and less of a political issue.”

Comments on this entry are closed.