Wolfram Alpha promises computational answers

Just when I started to get a handle of Stephen Wolfram’s Mathematica software, the scientists/mathematician is at it again. 

In May, Wolfram will unveil his latest creation, now called Wolfram Alpha. It applies his work with Mathematica and NKS (A New Kind of Science) to Web search.


“All one needs to be able to do is to take questions people ask in natural language, and represent them in a precise form that fits into the computations one can do,” Wolfram said in a recent blog post. “I’m happy to say that with a mixture of many clever algorithms and heuristics, lots of linguistic discovery and linguistic curation, and what probably amount to some serious theoretical breakthroughs, we’re actually managing to make it work… With one simple input field that gives access to a huge system, with trillions of pieces of curated data and millions of lines of algorithms.” 

Yowzers.  In short, what his new site aims to do is bring the web closer to a semantic world.  His site looks to be another step in mining deep database search, perfect to combine with Ubiquity

It’s also important to note that Wolfram Alpha doesn’t aim to displace Google and search.  This is about answers and semantic language on the web.  If you put in a factual question the site will answer it. 

Nova Spivack, CEO of Radar Networks, which developed Twine, an ambitious “interest network” Web application based on semantic Web technologies, said that Wolfram Alpha may be as “important for the Web (and the world) as Google, but for a different purpose.”

In a post on Tech Crunch, Spivak offered the following:

“Wolfram Alpha is like plugging into a vast electronic brain. It provides extremely impressive and thorough answers to a wide range of questions asked in many different ways, and it computes answers, it doesn’t merely look them up in a big database.”

“In this respect it is vastly smarter than (and different from) Google. Google simply retrieves documents based on keyword searches. Google doesn’t understand the question or the answer, and doesn’t compute answers based on models of various fields of human knowledge.”

Spivack gave some insight as to how the Wolfram’s search engine works:

Wolfram Alpha is a system for computing the answers to questions. To accomplish this it uses built-in models of fields of knowledge, complete with data and algorithms, that represent real-world knowledge.

For example, it contains formal models of much of what we know about science — massive amounts of data about various physical laws and properties, as well as data about the physical world.

Based on this you can ask it scientific questions and it can compute the answers for you. Even if it has not been programmed explicity to answer each question you might ask it.

But science is just one of the domains it knows about–it also knows about technology, geography, weather, cooking, business, travel, people, music, and more.

It also has a natural language interface for asking it questions. This interface allows you to ask questions in plain language, or even in various forms of abbreviated notation, and then provides detailed answers.

The vision seems to be to create a system which can do for formal knowledge (all the formally definable systems, heuristics, algorithms, rules, methods, theorems, and facts in the world) what search engines have done for informal knowledge (all the text and documents in various forms of media).

Wolfram’s engine isn’t going to replace Google, according to Spivack, although he suggests Google would like to own it.

“You would probably not use Wolfram Alpha to shop for a new car, find blog posts about a topic, or to choose a resort for your honeymoon. It is not a system that will understand the nuances of what you consider to be the perfect romantic getaway, for example–there is still no substitute for manual human-guided search for that. Where it appears to excel is when you want facts about something, or when you need to compute a factual answer to some set of questions about factual data.”

For now, we’ll have to wait until May to see whether the Web and the scientific community embrace Wolfram’s Alpha as a major breakthrough.  It also comes down to whether or not it works and works well.  For now, it’s just too early to determine.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • trypu March 9, 2009, 11:06 pm

    all in one search engine